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William Hart (1823–1894)

Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick

1861

Selected Works Thumbnails
William Hart (1823–1894), Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861, oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in., signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861

William Hart (1823–1894)
Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861
Oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in.
Signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861

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William Hart (1823–1894), Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861, oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in., signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861 (framed)

William Hart (1823–1894)
Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861
Oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in.
Framed dimensions: 40 x 56 in.
Signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861

Inquire
William Hart (1823–1894), Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861, oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in., signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861
William Hart (1823–1894), Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861, oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in., signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861 (framed)

Description

William Hart (1823–1894)
Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, 1861
Oil on canvas, 32 x 48 in.
Signed and dated lower left: Hart 1861

Provenance: H. A. Hurlbut, 1862; Godel & Co.; New York, 1993; private collection, New Mexico, 1994 to the present

Exhibited: Brooklyn Art Association, December 1861, no. 49; New York, National Academy of Design, 1862, no. 166; Stamford, Connecticut, Whitney Museum of American Art, Fairfield County, Realism and Romanticism in Nineteenth-Century New England Seascapes, September 15–November 29, 1989.

Grand Manan Island, Mount Desert Island, and the lush coastline of Maine were popular destinations for nineteenth-century Hudson River school painters, as these locations provided vistas in a “pure, natural state, dramatic cliffs and coves, and…isolation from industrial cities,” which made them perfect settings for artists like Hart to seek inspiration. [1]  

Sunset on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick offers a dramatic view of the coves, cliffs and rolling waves that are so characteristic of the locale.  Though the vista is pictorially faithful to its dramatic natural subject, Hart romanticizes it with vast spaces of sea, sky, and rocks.

[1] Gertrude Grace Sill, Realism & Romanticism in Nineteenth-Century New England Seascapes (Stamford, Connecticut: Whitney Museum of American Art, Fairfield County, 1989), 8.

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