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Edmund Greacen (1877–1949)

Southport Harbor

c. 1930-33

Selected Works Thumbnails
Edmund Greacen (1876–1949), Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in., signed lower left: Edmund Greacen

Edmund Greacen (1876–1949)
Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33
Oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.
Signed lower left: Edmund Greacen

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Edmund Greacen (1876–1949), Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.. signed lower left: Edmund Greacen (framed)

Edmund Greacen (1876–1949)
Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33
Oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.
Framed dimensions: 34 x 44 in.
Signed lower left: Edmund Greacen

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Edmund Greacen (1876–1949), Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in., signed lower left: Edmund Greacen
Edmund Greacen (1876–1949), Southport Harbor, c. 1930-33, oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.. signed lower left: Edmund Greacen (framed)

Description

Edmund Greacen (1876–1949)
Southport Harbor, c. 1930–33
Oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/8 in.
Signed lower left: Edmund Greacen
Inscribed on verso: Southport Harbor / by / Edmund Greacen / C-5
Inscribed on stretcher bar: Southport Harbor E- Greacen

Provenance: private collection, Fairfield, Connecticut, until 2010

Exhibited: National Academy of Design, 1931, no. 11, or 1933, no. 200; Bruce Museum of Art and Science, Greenwich, Pasture to Pond: Connecticut Impressionism, March 22–June 21, 2014, no. 29 (illustrated p. 65)

Related work: The Yacht Basin, oil on canvas, 26 x 36 in. (Sotheby’s, New York, September 25, 1991, lot 69); Southport Dock, 1930, 16 1/2 x 20 1/4 in. (location unknown).

While staying at Old Lyme in 1912, Greacen had painted the harbor at nearby Noank, and around 1930 he appears to have revisited the Connecticut shore, this time at Southport. Southport Harbor shows the yachts at anchor that fill the narrow inlet to this day. The distinctive balcony of the Pequot Yacht Club can be seen on the left, and on the right, the golf course of the Country Club of Fairfield stretches into the distance. Greacen’s gauzy, indistinct modeling and breezy, high-keyed palette were perfectly suited to this scene of calm summer leisure. The open water in the foreground suggests that Greacen sketched the view from another boat in the harbor.

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